District 215 and Thornton Township join forces against breast cancer

by Ernst Lamothe Jr.

CALUMET CITY, Ill. (October 2017) – In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Thornton Township Supervisor Frank Zuccarelli and the Board of Trustees along with Thornton Fractional School District 215 (headquartered in Lansing) created a Pink Out Football and Volleyball event. The October 13 football game and October 18 volleyball game both featured a Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign involving Thornton Fractional North High School, 755 Pulaski Road, Calumet City, Illinois.

Pink Out
The October 13 football game and October 18 volleyball game both featured a Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign involving Thornton Fractional North High School.

Football and volleyball players and coaches participated by wearing pink paraphernalia such as shoes, arm bands, and socks. Students who wore pink got into the game free. TF North Athletic Director Omari Garrett said, “We definitely want to continue to bring awareness. We had a moment of reflection prior to the National Anthem for anyone who has lost a love one to breast cancer, knows someone who is currently battling it, or has survived it.”

Ernst Lamothe Jr, Thornton Township Public and Community Relations Manager, said, “This is the second year we are partnering with a school district to bring a Pink Out event to the area. Last year we worked with several high schools. We are excited to be teaming up with District #215 and TF North.”

Lamothe continued, “We understand that breast cancer is an important issue, and we want to keep it in the forefront.”

About National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month begins on October 1 and ends on October 31. It is a chance to raise awareness about the importance of early detection of breast cancer. Through visibility events, people are encouraged to spread the word about mammograms and early detection.

Breast cancer is the second most common kind of cancer in women. About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point.

Most women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early. A mammogram—the screening test for breast cancer—can help find breast cancer early, when it’s easier to treat.

Women aged 40–49 are encouraged to talk with their doctor about when to start getting mammograms and how often to get them. Women aged 50–74 are encouraged to get a mammogram at least every 2 years.

Anyone with a close family member who has had breast or ovarian cancer is encouraged to a doctor about the risk and a plan for early detection.

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